Huey

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Huey

If you have more information on the ancestry of Andrew Huey or his wife, Nancy, I would appreciate it if you would email me and share that information.  style@southern-style.com   Finding out more about our Huey line might help us locate the gravesite of William Ramsey, the father of A.C. Ramsey.  William Ramsey married the daughter of Andrew Huey. 

 

Descendants of Andrew Huey

 

 

Generation No. 1

 

1.  ANDREW1 HUEY was born in Ireland.  He married NANCY.

 

Notes for ANDREW HUEY:

 

 

Ramsey, A. C., Memoirs of a Methodist Circuit Rider, p. 78

 

During this interval my uncle George Huey who lived in Bibb County, Alabama visited us, to see his Father and mother, and sisters, who were then alive and lived on our place.  I made my arrangements to go back with him and spend a few days there and then go on to Tuscaloosa.  Which I accordingly did.  But had like to have lost my horse in swimming him across the Cahawba River, by the side of a canoe, which was a very awkward and clumsy one, and the river being swollen, and current rapid, the boat took a sheer on us and pitched into a thick clump of bushes and trees.  I holding the bridle kept his head above the water, while he managed to untangle his limbs, and we pushed forward, so that he struck bottom and got out safely; much to the joy of my heart.  This was on a Sunday morning.  I had an appointment, and tried to preach that day in a little shabby church, and to a little congregation of apparent careless listeners.  Spent that night and next day with Uncle John Huey, and on Tuesday morning started for Tuscaloosa which place I reached Wednesday morning.  Rode up in front of the Hotel where a gentleman met me, asked my name, and remarked "I suppose you have come to attend the conference," I told him I had, "said he light" my name is Walker.  It proved to be Rev. R. L.Walker, the stationed preacher in the Methodist Church of that place, and to whom was assigned the duty of providing homes for the preachers.  I was soon assigned to my quarters, my hose taken charge of and cared for; and for that week I had nothing to do but attend the sittings of the conference, witness and learn the working of this machinery of the church, attend public worship, form new acquaintances and c. and upon the whole had an exceedingly pleasant time.

 

        Children of ANDREW HUEY and NANCY are:

2.                i.       NANCY ELIZABETH2 HUEY, b. September 15, 1787, Ireland; d. June 18, 1836, Red Creek, Wayne MS.

                  ii.       JOHN HUEY.

 

Notes for JOHN HUEY:

Ramsey, A.C., Memoirs of a Methodist Circuit Rider, p. 29.

 

In 1819 Father's crop of corn was very fine; but afreshet in the latter part of August, completely covered the field except a few high ridges; the corn being nearly dry, but in a state to sour and rot, but little of it was saved in a condition that could be used.  And what was saved was mostly done by getting skiffs, & ferry boats; and wading, diving and swimming, and thereby collecting, or pulling it, and carrying to the highlands, where it was exposed to the sun to be dried, but all to little purpose, mostly rotted.  The result of this mode of harvesting a crop; connected with the germs of fever produced by this late overflow of the large swamps that lay near us; produced a bad state of health in the family; Chills and fever; hacking agues, took hold of several members of the family, and among whom was Uncle John Huey who lived with us that year; and who had a long and severe attack; besides other members of the family.

 

The year before this 1818 Cousin W. N. Gracey, to whom allusion has already been made; lived with us and during that year he embraced religion, under the ministry of Rev. J. I. E. Byrd who was on the circuit that year.  At the close of the year Cousin Gracey left and went back to Tennessee; where he attached himself to the Cumberland Presbyterian Church and became a minister in that denomination.

 

                 iii.       DANIEL HUEY.

 

Notes for DANIEL HUEY:

Ramsey, A. C., Memoirs of a Methodist Circuit Rider, p. 19.

 

My uncle Daniel Huey (mother's brother) was in this war under General Jackson, and returned to Father's at the close very much debilitated had been sick for some time.  Mother took him in charge and by strictly dieting and nursing him he soon regained his health, and settled down as school teacher in Jefferson County on the Mississippi River where he married and raised a family and amassed a considerable property which he finally sold and moved to Illinois or Indiana.

 

I think he always attributed the restoration of his health to Mother's feeding him on "Indian sofkey", a dish which she learned to prepare from the Indians.  The ingredients were, cracked corn, or hominy, beaten in a mortar, boiled until done; with a certain portion of ley; made fro ashes.  This was an excellent dish, a regulator of the stomach and bowels, and which if used now; would be far superior to thousands of the nostrums that are selling in the country.

 

                 iv.       GEORGE HUEY.

 

Notes for GEORGE HUEY:

Ramsey, A. C., Memoirs of a Methodist Circuit Rider, p. 78

 

During this interval my uncle George Huey who lived in Bibb County, Alabama visited us, to see his Father and mother, and sisters, who were then alive and lived on our place.  I made my arrangements to go back with him and spend a few days there and then go on to Tuscaloosa.  Which I accordingly did.  But had like to have lost my horse in swimming him across the Cahawba River, by the side of a canoe, which was a very awkward and clumsy one, and the river being swollen, and current rapid, the boat took a sheer on us and pitched into a thick clump of bushes and trees.  I holding the bridle kept his head above the water, while he managed to untangle his limbs, and we pushed forward, so that he struck bottom and got out safely; much to the joy of my heart.  This was on a Sunday morning.  I had an appointment, and tried to preach that day in a little shabby church, and to a little congregation of apparent careless listeners.  Spent that night and next day with Uncle John Huey, and on Tuesday morning started for Tuscaloosa which place I reached Wednesday morning.  Rode up in front of the Hotel where a gentleman met me, asked my name, and remarked "I suppose you have come to attend the conference," I told him I had, "said he light" my name is Walker.  It proved to be Rev. R. L.Walker, the stationed preacher in the Methodist Church of that place, and to whom was assigned the duty of providing homes for the preachers.  I was soon assigned to my quarters, my hose taken charge of and cared for; and for that week I had nothing to do but attend the sittings of the conference, witness and learn the working of this machinery of the church, attend public worship, form new acquaintances and c. and upon the whole had an exceedingly pleasant time.

 

 

 

Generation No. 2

 

2.  NANCY ELIZABETH2 HUEY (ANDREW1) was born September 15, 1787 in Ireland, and died June 18, 1836 in Red Creek, Wayne MS.  She married WILLIAM RAMSEY, JR., son of WILLIAM RAMSEY and JEMIMA.

 

Notes for NANCY ELIZABETH HUEY:

Ramsey, A. C., Memoirs of a Methodist Circuit Rider, p.1

"I was born in Jackson County, Georgia, November 4th 1807.  My father, William Ramsey was born in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina July 27th 1770.  My mother, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Huey, was born in Ireland September 15th, 1787.  Her parents Andrew and Nancy Huey came to America when she was an infant and settled in Pennsylvania.  How long they remained in that State I do not know but moved from there to Georgia and settled in Franklin County; if my memory is correct.  And here let me remark that this with many others narrated is this sketch, are given from recollections of what my parents told me, many long years ago.  My father was twice married, his first wife was a Miss Woodside, who lived but a short while, after their marriage and left no issue.  And whether their marriage took place in North Carolina, or Georgia I am not prepared to state positively, but think it was in the former state.  Father moved to Georgia, but at what time, I do not know.  He thus became acquainted with Mother and at a proper time, married her.  They settled in Jackson County, to which Grandfather Huey had moved.  Here my brother Andrew and myself were born, the only two out of five who were native Georgians.

 

Notes for WILLIAM RAMSEY, JR.:

From History of Methodism in Alabama and West Florida. 

by Marion Elsas Lazenby

"We mention these families of culture, character and prominence because so much has been said about the wickedness of the early settlers in Alabama.  Among these early settlers were many whose culture and religion will ever be a source of pride to their descendants. 

 

Among these were William Ramsey...and many others. West gives an account of the coming of William Ramsey, obtained from the well-preserved journal of Abiezer Clarke Ramsey, son of William, which journal is now in the hands of his granddaughters, Misses Corrie, Marie and Frances Benson at Forest Home, and in whose parents home, A.C. Ramsey died on Jan. 23, 1891.  A grandson of the Rev. Mr. Ramsey, W.W. Benson, one of the state's distinguished educators, and one of Methodism's most useful members, likewise died in this home in 1953.

 

William Ramsey was born in Mecklenburg County, N.C., July 27, 1770, later moving to Jackson County, Georgia, where two of his children were born.  He moved in 1808 to Chickasawhay River, in Mississippi, afterwards within the bounds of the Tombecbee Circuit.

 

Even to get seed corn he had to return to St. Stephens, or the Tombigbee River, and pay four dollars a bushel for it.  Other provisions were alike scarce and at exorbitant prices.  The building of the cabin, clearing the field, planting the corn, making benches, stools, and chairs, securing the spinning wheel, constructing the rude loom, the slow process of picking the seed out of the cotton, spinning, spooling, reeling, dyeing, sizing, warping, and sleiding thread, weaving cloth, and obtaining other household necessities, kept him busy.  Confronted by scarcity of provisions and exorbitant prices and by the heavy losses he sustained, the question is how did he and his household manage to subsist?

 

At the end of 1808 Ramsey sold his improvements (he did not own his own land) and moved down the Chickasawhay and built a cabin and opened a new clearing on the spot now occupied by Winchester.  He felled the first tree ever felled in the town of Winchester.  Here he lived when Sturdivant and Burdge visited him."

        Ramsey lived in a number of different places in this general section.  His last home was on the banks of Red Creek, where he died and was buried in 1833.  He was a man of great industry, of uncommon energy, and of economical habits...of unquestioned integrity, and much esteemed by his neighbors.  As a Christian he was full of faith and good deeds, and had a profound experience of divine things.  His patience under suffering was beautiful.  His death was triumphant.  His wife died June 8, 1836 and was buried by his side. 

"The little caravan...consisted of himself on foot, his wife on a horse, with her child, Andrew, not more than two and a half years old, seated behind her, and her baby, Abiezer Clark, then less than four months old, in her lap, Dinah, a Negro girl, on foot, and two pack horses loaded with what household goods and camp equipage they could carry.  This little band found nearly the whole way infested with Indians, and their progress often retarded by streams that were not fordable, and that were without bridges or ferries.

 

The trip commences in January and the Chickashawhay was reached Feb. 21, 1808.  None can refuse to pause and view the unique scene of this woman mounted on a horse, with her helpless offspring packed about her, making this trip across more than half the State of Georgia, and across the entire state of Alabama, with menacing savages hanging on nearly every step, and swollen streams, bridgeless and ferryless encountered every day!

 

Mr. Ramsey unloaded his pack horses on the Chickasawhay River near the Choctaw boundary and near what is now Waynesborough.  Here he built his cabin, made his first clearing, and raised his first crop all in 1808.  When he reached the Chickasawhay, his entire estate consisted of three horses, the baggage which the two pack horses had conveyed there, the Negro girl, Dinah, and twenty-one dollars in cash.  He had neither provisions, house nor field.  One of the horses fell off the river bluff and was drowned; another was stolen by the Indians and was never recovered...there was little in that land on which to subsist, except the spontaneous products of the country.

 

Ramsey, A. C., Memoirs of a Methodist Circuit Rider, "MY FATHER'S DEATH", (On William Ramsey, Jr. who married Nancy Elizabeth Huey) p. 86

 

At my appointment in July at Salem Camp Ground (1833), I was met by brother Andrew, who bore to me the sad news of the death of Father, which had taken place at his home on Red Creek, the 19th of that month (July).  This was to me and all the family an afflictive providence.  Although he had been for a number of years, a great sufferer, so that he was perfectly helpless, not able to feed or dress himself; and to an outsider looking from worldly side; and relief from care, on our part, and relief from suffering on his, with the blessed Hope of rest hereafter, as entertained by him; from that stand point, it might have been thought best for both.  But the parental tie, had so bound us together, and the reverence and affectionate regard, which cemented and bound us to him, that the labour anxiety and care consequent upon nursing, and watching over him, was not onerous, as to cause a wish that relief should be obtained, only by his death.  But so ordered it, and while we could but weep and lament the sad bereavement, we "sorrowed not as those who had no hope."  He died at age 68 years 11 months 22 days.  Father was an energetic, economical, manager in his domestic affairs; and these elements coupled with a sound unwavering faith and Christian experience in divine things constituted the basis upon which he built up a moral superstructure, of respectability an usefulness, wherever he lived, or among those whom he mingled.  One worthy of the imitation of all.  These virtues and Christian graces was not only prominent in health; but being supplemented by great patience in suffering; it may I think be justly said, He not only did, but likewise suffered the will of God, as become one of His children.  O that his children who yet remain; his long line of descendants, of grand children and great grandchildren that are now scattered, in Alabama, Mississippi, Texas, Arkansas and Missouri, may all emulate his virtues, die in peace and meet him in Heaven, where we humbly trust and hope he now: rests from his labours and his works follow him.  Amen

 

        Children of NANCY HUEY and WILLIAM RAMSEY are:

3.                i.       ABIEZER CLARK3 RAMSEY, b. November 25, 1807, Jackson County, Georgia; d. January 23, 1891, Forest Homes, Al.

                  ii.       ANDREW WOODSIDE RAMSEY, b. January 01, 1806.

4.              iii.       ANN PORTER RAMSEY, b. January 04, 1810, Wayne, MS; d. March 31, 1867, Lawrence, MS.

5.              iv.       WILLIAM J. RAMSEY, b. December 15, 1811, Leakesville, MS; d. April 07, 1880, Harrison, MS.

                  v.       DANIEL RAMSEY, b. 1814; d. 1887, Bell Fountain, Jackson County; m. MAHALA HOLDER.

 

Notes for DANIEL RAMSEY:

Ramsey, A. C. , Memoirs of a Methodist Circuit Rider, p. 125.

 

Brother Daniel's marriage, life and death

 

He was my youngest brother who with brother William had remained single, taking care and providing for Father and Mother in their declining years, and nursed them both until they died, and now as the connecting link that bound them to the old homestead, was severed; it became necessary that thy should secure another link, that would bind them to homes of their own; accordingly, (brother William had already married) on the 12th of February of this year 1837, broth Daniel was married to Miss Mahala Holder, daughter of Willis Holder then of Jasper County, Mississippi, a part of the history of whose life has already been noticed in these sketches.  He settled in that Country when he was brought up, and in which he spent his life, became pious and a useful citizen and member of the church, accumulated property and raised a family of nine children, all of whom are grown and married, and considerably scattered.  One in Missouri, one in Texas; two in Alabama and the balance at and near the coast where he died, which occurred, at his home at Bell Fountain in Jackson County, Mississippi where he was buried, in 1887.

 

 

 

Generation No. 3

 

3.  ABIEZER CLARK3 RAMSEY (NANCY ELIZABETH2 HUEY, ANDREW1) was born November 25, 1807 in Jackson County, Georgia, and died January 23, 1891 in Forest Homes, Al.  He married ELIZABETH AMANDA WARDLAW August 03, 1837, daughter of JAMES WARDLAW and HANNAH CLARK.

Notes for ELIZABETH AMANDA WARDLAW:

Ramsey, A. C., Memoirs of a Methodist Circuit Rider, p. 126

 

One important event in my history occur with me that year.  On the 4th day of August I was united in marriage with Mrs. Elizabeth Amanda Bonham, a widow with four children, a fearful and responsible undertaking I knew, but so it was, I voluntarily assumed the position, influenced I think by no other motive than pure affection for the object of my choice, and probability of placing myself in a condition to be able from declining health to be more useful; to do ore good to the cause of Christ and my fellow man, than I otherwise were doing, or could do; I selected her and the position with the knowledge, and apprehension of the dangers involved; subjecting me to the misjudged opinion of many at the time, that mercenary or sinister motives, were the ruling principle that governed my action.  Yet while I was aware that probably I might incur burthens and responsibilities, too great for me in caring for her and her children, managing a business with which I had but little acquaintance, and thereby make a failure, and ring upon me the abuse, and anathemas of those who were intimately connected, by ties of relationship with the family; besides the slander and gossip of others; I of course, feeling conscious of the honesty of my motive could but enter into such an alliance with fear and trembling.  But believing and knowing that I should have the aid of a woman, of sense, of principle, of management care and industry, and the best of all, one of devotion and affection for me I married her; and took charge of her business, and which so managed afterwards, I believe, in every instance, as to not only meet her approval, but likewise the approbation of her friends, and those more directly interestd in is proper adjustment.  And while I had many annoyances, and much harassing labour to perform and scenes to pass through found her as I expected her to be, a helpmete; a loving sympathetic companion through life.  Among one of the most domestic, careful, business housekeepers I ever knew.  She was a religious woman; never opposed me in going where I thought I ought to preach, or to attend to any work connected with the church to which I was called; but was to her a great pleasure to know that I was trying to do all I could for he cause of Christ.

 

She lived to be the mother of seven of my children and after suffering for a considerable length of time, died June 30, 1854 at our home at Oak Hill in Wilcox County, Alabama where her remains now lie at the graveyard at that place.  Gave satisfactory assurances in her affliction, that her peace was made with God, and had a bright hope of Eternal life.

 

        Children of ABIEZER RAMSEY and ELIZABETH WARDLAW are:

                   i.       DAVID WARDLAW4 RAMSEY , CIVIL WAR, b. January 14, 1848, Oak Hill, Alabama Wilcox County, Civil War; d. March 08, 1916, Pineapple, Al  Wilcox County; m. EMMA VIRGINIA HAWTHORNE, January 24, 1866.

 

Notes for DAVID WARDLAW RAMSEY , CIVIL WAR:

Ramsey, A. C., Memoirs of a Methodist Circuit Rider, p. 140

 

My first son's birth

 

This occurred on the 14th of January of this year, and was named by my wife's Uncle for himself "David Wardlaw."  Who at the time of naming him was sick, and not expecting to live, desired of us both, who were then with him, to let him give our boy a name, to which we consented.  He at the time had me engaged writing his will, in he bequeathed to all his nephews who had been named after him a certain legacy, besides dividing the balance of his estate among his relatives.  And in this distribution left to our son, one thousand dollars, besides a certain portion to my wife and her children separately.  After the will was written he told me to fold it up and put it in a certain dresser, and when company came in he would sign it.  He continued to linger, and although I was with him frequently yet feeling a delicacy, and knowing him to be a very correct and prompt man in his business affairs; believing he had signed and fixed up his will, as he had been up, and able to go about, and attend to other business; never asked him about it, and after he died I found the document in he same condition I had left it, not signed except it showed some signs of being handled by him.  Thus was every legatee, named in that will, deprived of realizing anything by it.  He had no family, had lived a bachelor, amassed a find property and at his death, or afterwards scattered to the four winds.

 

 

Note--to Editor of Wilcox Era

Rev. A.C. Ramsey

On Sept. 15th, 1929 there appeared in the newspapers an article stating that a large number of letters written during the War between the States by Confederate prisoners in Camp Chase Columbus, Ohio ha been found. These letters had never been sent through the mail. The Legislature of Ohio in recent years gave permission for them to be turned over to the U.D.C. in the published list was made of the above letter from Capt. D.W. Ramsey to his father Rev. A. C. Ramsey, Allenton, Alabama. W.W. Benson sent the newspaper article to Mr. Hawthorne Ramsey, Dothan, Alabama, a son of Capt. Ramsey and he apparently sent to the proper authorities and secured the letter, of which the above is a copy. All parties mentioned in this old letter art interesting to Wilcoxians. W.W. Benson, Supt. of City Schools, Decatur, Ala. Grandson of Rev. A.C. Ramsey.

We wish to thank Professor Benson for the above as Capt. D. W. Ramsey was well-known and greatly beloved by many of our readers.

Camp Chase near Columbus O, April 19th, 1862

Address:

Via Fortress Monroe

Care of General Wool

Dear Father:

Knowing that you are exceedingly anxious to hear from us, I this evening having a favorable opportunity will write you a short letter. I am only allowed to write but one page. The officers of our regiment have been in this prison since the 2th inst. We were surrounded at Island No. 10 on the 8th inst. A history of which you have doubtless received before this. We were separated from our men the day after the surrender. They were sent either to Chicago or Springfield I have not ascertained yet, which place. Although we have written to both Joe McCracken and Bob were both well when I parted with them. It was certainly a sore trial to be so separated. But of course we could say nothing. Joe Benson is now sick in the hospital with Rheumatism and Erysipelas, but is improving fast. I have not been perfectly well since I left Pensacola. I have not been confined to my bed but very little and hope soon to be perfectly well since I left Pensacola. I have not been confined to my bed but very little, and hope soon to be entirely well. We are very treated here, and, in truth, as a general thing all Federal officers with whom we have been thrown have treated us kindly and gentlemanly. It is important for me to give you here an account of our surrender were I so diagnosed. it is impossible for me to give you here an account of our surrender were I so disposed and I can only ask you and all other friends to the company to assist us bearing our misfortunes patiently. Write to me immediately and let me know whether any members of my company have ever reached home. Also if Lee got home. I left at No. 10 and have never heard of him since. I will write to you again soon. Give my most affectionate love to all. I expect to see them again. Your affectionate son, DW Ramsey

 

 

 

 

 

Smith, Robert A. and Frances Donald Dudley Grimes. History of Pine Apple: Wilcox County, Alabama, 1990.

 

The Ramsey Family has early and prominent beginnings in Wilcox and Butler counties.  The ancestor of the Pine Apple branch was the Reverend Abiezer C. Ramsey (born in Jackson County, Georgia in 1807).  He married Elizabeth Amanda Wardlaw (born 1805) of Abbeville, South Carolina, in 1837 after the death of her first husband, a Mr. Bonham.  They settled in Oak Hill, Alabama.  Reverend Ramsey served as a Methodist circuit rider from 1832 until 1839 when the demands of his Mtime to run his wife's plantation forced him to give up the ministry.  Seven children were added to the three daughters Mrs. Ramsey had from her first marriage.  The Reverend Ramsey and his wife, Amanda Elizabeth, are buried in the Oak Hill Cemetery. The eldest son of this couple, David Wardlaw Ramsey, was born in 1840 in Oak Hill.  David graduated and received an A.B. degree from the Kentucky Military Institute in Frankfort, Kentucky.  After returning to Wilcox County, he studied medicine under Dr. D. J. Fox and Dr. I. G. W. Steedman of Camden, Alabama for a period of two years.

 

When the War Between the States began, young David enlisted with the famed Wilcox County "True Blues" on February 0, 1861, at Allenton, Alabama.  He soon achieved the rank of Captain.  Ramsey was a P.O.W. on two separate occasions and spent the greater portion of his service as a Confederate Officer in a "Yankee" P.O.W. camp.  After his release he returned to his beloved Wilcox County and on February 1, 1866 married Mary Virginia Hawthorne of Pine Apple in the Hawthorne home (the boyhood home of Major General John Herbert Kelly).  His life was considerably altered after his wife converted him into joining the Friendship Baptist Church where he was ordained as a Baptist minister in 1883.  He served in that capacity until 1887.  Returning in 1892, he remained until 1903.  He served as moderator for the Pine Barren Baptist Association of Eastern Wilcox County from 1878 through 1908.  Prior to entering the ministry and after release from war service and his marriage, David Wardlaw Ramsey obtained his medical degree from what is now Tulane University in 1870.  He served as physician in Pine Apple from 1870 until his ordination as pastor in 1883.  This civic-minded professional man was father to eight children (Cassie Virginia, Emma Cornelia, Mary Benson, Arthur Clark, Richard Hawthorne, Laura, D.W., Jr., and Bertha).  Cassie, the eldest daughter, was the only one who remained in Pine Apple.  She married J. B. Adams.  Their only daughter , Bertha Matheson Adams was raised by her aunt, Addie Adams Matheson, after the untimely death of both parents in the typhoid epidemic in 1893. 

 

Dr./Reverend David W. Ramsey also lost his first wife, Emma Virginia, during the same typhoid epidemic that claimed the lives of his daughter and son in law.  Dr. Ramsey married Lucile Liles in 1894 and remained in Pine Apple until his death in 1916.  Bertha Adams, the last of the direct Ramsey clan to live in Pine Apple died in 1972.  Richard Hawthorne Ramsey, the second son of Dr. Ramsey raised his family in Dothan, Alabama, (Cassie, Richard Hawthorne, Jr., Frances and J.Robert).  Richard H. Ramsey, Jr. was prominent in Dothan affairs and was the father of Lester H. Ramsey, Richard Heywood, and Jon and Joy Ramsey. 

 

Joseph Robert Ramsey also raised his family in Dothan.  His children were Phillip H., Edward L., Joel W. and William A..  Frances Ramsey Fore's only child is Catherine Ford Fancher who lives in Los Angeles.

 

                  ii.       ROBERT CLARKE RAMSEY , CIVIL WAR, d. June 17, 1862.

                 iii.       JANE PERRIN RAMSEY, b. May 17, 1838; m. MCCRACKIN.

                 iv.       MARY ELIZA RAMSEY, m. BENSON.

                  v.       WILLIAM ANDREW KING RAMSEY.

                 vi.       CORNELIA PORTER RAMSEY.

                vii.       ABIZER CLARK RAMSEY.

 

4.  ANN PORTER3 RAMSEY (NANCY ELIZABETH2 HUEY, ANDREW1) was born January 04, 1810 in Wayne, MS, and died March 31, 1867 in Lawrence, MS.  She married JOHN THOMAS LONGINO , JR. August 04, 1825.

 

Notes for ANN PORTER RAMSEY:

A.C. Ramsey, Memoirs of a Methodist Circuit Rider, p.56

Marriage of my Sister Ann

This event occurred August 4th 1825 when she formed an alliance with John R. Longine of Lawrence County, Mississippi; a gentleman of fine moral habits, and their union was a happy one.  They settled on Crooked Creek in said county; where they resided until 1827 when they removed and settled near us on Red Crook, where they remained until after Father's death; and then went back to Lawrence and spent the rest of their lives there; raising a large family of children, who are now in that country. at and around the Old Homestead, doing well; respectable and useful citizens, and members of the Baptist Church mostly.  Their eldest son moved to Missouri the only one of the eleven children outside of Lawrence County who are alive.  Augustus died during the war, John T. was killed at Franklin Tennessee. 

 

Brother and Sister Longine, were both members of the Methodist church while they lived near us on Red Creek, and for several years after they returned to Lawrence; but being cut off almost entirely from church privileges in that communion; and being surrounded by and associated mostly with large churches, and communities, of the Baptist denomination they united with that church, and lived and died acceptable members thereof testifying at the last their readiness to depart.

 

        Children of ANN RAMSEY and JOHN LONGINO are:

                   i.       AUGUSTUS4 LONGINO.

                  ii.       JOHN T. LONGINO, d. Franklin, Tennessee.

 

5.  WILLIAM J.3 RAMSEY (NANCY ELIZABETH2 HUEY, ANDREW1) was born December 15, 1811 in Leakesville, MS, and died April 07, 1880 in Harrison, MS.  He married MARY FAIRLEY, daughter of JUDGE JOHN FAIRLEY.

 

Notes for WILLIAM J. RAMSEY:

Ramsey, A. C., Memoirs of a Methodist Circuit Rider, p. 119.

 

During this time Brother William had married miss Mary Fairly, daughter of Judge John Fairley; and was living at our old homestead.  Brother Daniel was living there also with them, had not yet married.  Brother William soon after, settled a place between Red Creek and he coast, which he improved, and is still living at the same place, has never moved; done well.  His wife after bearing him nine children died; and since he has married again a Miss Sabra Davis has been blessed with two good wives.

 

        Children of WILLIAM RAMSEY and MARY FAIRLEY are:

                   I.       JOHN4 RAMSEY, b. Abt. 1837, MS.1; d. WFT Est. 1868-1928, UNKNOWN2; m. SARAH CUNNINGHAM, WFT Est. 1868-19023.

                  ii.       WILLIAM"RUFUS" RAMSEY, b. Abt. 18394; d. WFT Est. 1840-19295.

                 iii.       ANDREW JEFFERSON RAMSEY, b. Abt. 1841, MS.6; d. WFT Est. 1872-1932, UNKNOWN7; m. MARY MYERS, WFT Est. 1872-19068.

                 iv.       ARMANDA RAMSEY, b. Abt. 18429; d. WFT Est. 1843-193610.

                  v.       NEPHY ANN RAMSAY, b. February 19, 1844, HARRISON CO.MS.11; d. April 05, 188312; m. DANIEL JOHN READ, January 12, 186813.

                 vi.       JAMES POLK RAMSEY, b. December 23, 1845, MS.14; d. November 05, 1911, COALVILLE, MS15; m. MARY MARGARET READ, January 14, 1875, HARRISON CO., MS.16.

                vii.       ISABELL"EMMA' RAMSEY, b. Abt. 184817; d. WFT Est. 1849-194218.

               viii.       LEWIS C. RAMSEY, b. Abt. 184919; d. WFT Est. 1850-193920.